The rainy season in Tulum lasts from June to October, with August and September being the rainiest, these two months have the best hotel and airplane rates throughout the year. Bear in mind that when it rains in the Mexican Caribbean, the storm usually passes by as quickly as it arrives, since the wind comes from the ocean and we don’t have any mountains.

If you happen to experience bad weather in Tulum, do not worry, there are still fascinating activities that you would probably miss if it was sunny outside.

Here are some suggestions on what to do if there is bad weather in Tulum.

 

SPA:  Tulum has an extense variety of spas, almost every hotel has their own where you can find all the traditional massages such as Swedish, deep tissue, hot stones etc. As well as exotic chocolate or wine body wraps that will awaken all your senses. Bad weather in Tulum could be the best excuse to pamper yourself without missing out on the sun.

 

TEMAZCAL: The Temazcal is a Mayan sweat lodge. A small group of people are welcomed into a dome shaped stone igloo, the small door is covered with large tree leaves and heavy blankets to keep the heat inside. Being completely in the dark, you will inhale the vapors of medicinal herbs and “copal” incense which allow a true cleansing of the body and mind, accompanied by chanting and Mayan rituals from a “Xaman”.  It is an intense purification ritual which gives you a unique experience to connect with yourself and nature.

 

MOVIE TIME: This is a must if you are having bad weather in Tulum. “Zine” is a private minimalistic, industrial, eco-chic, state of the art home movie theatre concept in the middle of the jungle, and it seats up to 12 guests. You can reserve online and purchase your gourmet lunch or dinner package to be enjoyed during the projection of the movie of your choice. https://zinetulum.com

 

CENOTES: These are Mayan sinkholes enclaved in the jungle, most of them are located inside huge caverns decorated with countless stalagtites and stalagmites formed millions of years ago where you can also discover distinct flora and fauna. The water is usually cold and always pristine, as it comes from rainwater filtering slowly through the lime stone surface.

 

You can snorkel or practice cavern diving if you have the proper certification. Most of the cenotes are privately owned and require an entrance fee, they also provide snorkeling gear for rent. Please take care of these marvelous gifts from nature, by not applying sunscreen or mosquito repellant before entering the water. Check with the hotel’s front desk for more information.

Enjoy Tulum in every kind of weather!